13 April 2010

"Questions that are sometimes asked"

Marginal Revolution | Tyler Cowen | Questions that are sometimes asked
But when the 60 percent of Americans are net recipients of federal benefits, is it at least possible that some are not desperately poor?
That's Rehan Salam, the link is here.
One of Cowen's commenters raises some doubts about the assumptions of the study Salam links to, but this is still a question worth asking in a general sense.

I feel like there are a lot of policies that start out, either historically or rhetorically, with something virtuous like "let's fight homelessness and make sure everyone has a roof over their head" but end up being implemented as monkeying around with interest rates and mortgage regulations to help middle class people buy houses in the suburbs.

2 comments:

  1. "let's fight homelessness and make sure everyone has a roof over their head"

    Funny - that's Habitat for Humanity's goal. People who receive HFH homes are actually poor people who need a break.

    Ad: I have done a modest amount of work for HFH - it is a nice feeling driving by a home (one is down the road a bit) and thinking 'Yeah, I hung sheet rock there last summer.'

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  2. Dude, I totally think that's a noble thing to do. Habitat is a great program.

    It's just that people use the same arguments to justify everything from homeless shelters on up to Fannie May.

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